An Experiment in Criticism ch 1-3
An Experiment in Criticism ch 1-3 E-mail

An Experiment in Criticism
Chapters 1-3


 

Chapter 1

1.  List the four contrasts C. S. Lewis makes between "the majority" (the many) and "the literary" (the few).  



2.  What are some titles you have re-read?



3.  How do you feel when deprived of the opportunity to read?



4.  When have you fed on a great picture - or a good book, film, or musical composition - for years? 





Chapter 2

5.  Lewis describes several more types of readers.  Select one and discuss what keeps this type from being literary in C. S. Lewis's sense of the word.  Have you, or someone you know, fallen into one of these categories?




6.  Lewis talks about the danger of making literature a school subject.  Do you agree/disagree?




7.  What constitutes a true reader?




8.  What problem does Lewis find with the term "serious reader"?  What does he propose instead?





Notes

Cognoscenti:  Well-informed people with a specialized knowledge; connoisseurs.

Gigadibs:  Refers to a shallow journalist in Robert Browning's poem "Bishop Blougram's Apology" (1855).  In 1013 lines of blank verse, the Bishop defends his faith against  charges leveled by the skeptical journalist named Gigadibs.

Dryasdust:  A boring speaker.  Refers to Jonas Dryasdust, an imaginary literary authority Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) utilized to provide background information in his novels.

Andromaque: A tragedy by French playwright Jean Racine (1639-1699) set during the aftermath of the Trojan War.

Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950):  American author known for his Tarzan series.

Alexandrine:  A line of verse containing 12 syllables.

 I. A. Richards (1893-1979): A contemporary of Lewis who wrote literary criticism and co-authored The Meaning of Meaning (1923) which dealt with the contextual theory of language.  Lewis would not have been in agreement with Richards; nevertheless, Lewis recognized Richards as "a critic whose works are almost the necessary starting-point for all future literary theory" (Selected Literary Essays, p. 278n). Richards believed that the arts should replace religion and belief in the modern world.

Eumenides:  Part 3 of Aeschylus' tragedy, The Oresteia.  A euphemistic term for the Greek Furies, spirits who tormented the guilty.

François Rabelais (1783-1553):  French Renaissance writer, priest and scholar.

Fabliaux (pl):  A genre for French literature consisting of a brief, raunchy, comic tale in verse. Chaucer reworked some into the Canterbury Tales.

"The Rape of the Lock":  A mock-epic satirical poem by Alexander Pope.

Kickshaw:  A fancy food or trinket.

"smiles from reason flow":  From Milton's Paradise Lost, Book IX, Line 239.


Chapter 3

9.  How did Lewis use illustrations as a child?  What is the purpose of toys or ikons?




10.  What constitutes real appreciation of art according to Lewis?




11.  Describe a time when a work of art did something to you.





Notes

The Monarch of the Glen:  An oil painting by Sir Edwin Landseer commissioned for Westminster Palace.  Depicting a stag against a Scottish landscape, it became popular
especially for use in advertising.  The Hartford Financial Services Group, for instance, uses it as a logo.

The Old Shepherd's Chief Mourner:  Another work by Landseer, this time of a bereft dog resting his head on his master's coffin.

Bubbles:  A painting by Sir John Everett Mills of a small boy blowing bubbles that was used in advertising Pears soap.

Trompe-l'oeil:  An art technique using perspective to create an illusion.  For example, a wall mural may feature a door or hallway to give the impression of a larger space.

Tintoretto (1518-1594):  Italian Renaissance painter whose work The Three Graces features nude women.

Botticelli (1445-1510):  Italian Renaissance painter whose work Mars and Venus depicts the Roman gods reclining in a grove attended by satyrs.

Cimabue (1240-1302):  Florentine painter whose work Crucifixion departed from the flat Byzantine style of art and moved toward naturalism.

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (1880-1938):  German expressionist painter.  The Nazis considered his work degenerate.  He committed suicide in 1938.

Hoarding:  billboard

Zum Eckel find' ich immer nur mich: Probably a line from Wagner's opera Die Walk?re and translates roughly, "I find forever only myself, ad nauseam."  

Berceuse:  A musical composition in 6/8 time intended for a lullaby.

Impi:  Zulu for an armed regiment.  The Zulu are an ethnic group living in South Africa whose language is known for its clicking sound.

Précis:  A summary or abstract.

Lacrimose (or lachrymose):  Tearful, mournful, given to weeping.



© 2014 by Allyson Wieland



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 





An Experiment in Criticism



By C. S. Lewis



 



 



 



Chapter 1



 



1.  List the four contrasts C. S. Lewis makes
between "the majority" (the many) and "the literary" (the few). 



 



 



 



2.  What are some titles you have re-read?



 



 



 



3.  How do you feel when deprived of the
opportunity to read?



 



 



 



4.  When have you fed on a great picture - or a
good book, film, or musical composition - for years?



 



 



 



 



Chapter 2



 



5.  Lewis describes several more types of
readers.  Select one and discuss what
keeps this type from being literary in C. S. Lewis's sense of the word.  Have you, or someone you know, fallen into
one of these categories?



 



 



6.  Lewis talks about the danger of making
literature a school subject.  Do you
agree/disagree?



 



 



 



7.  What constitutes a true reader?



 



 



 



8.  What problem does Lewis find with the term
"serious reader"?  What does he propose
instead?



 



 



 



 



Notes



 



Cognoscenti:  Well-informed people with a specialized
knowledge; connoisseurs.



 



Gigadibs:  Refers to a shallow journalist in Robert
Browning's poem "Bishop Blougram's Apology" (1855).  In 1013 lines of blank verse, the Bishop
defends his faith against charges leveled by the skeptical journalist named
Gigadibs.



 



Dryasdust:  A boring speaker.  Refers to Jonas Dryasdust, an imaginary
literary authority Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) utilized to provide background
information in his novels.



 



Andromaque: A tragedy by
French playwright Jean Racine (1639-1699) set during the aftermath of the
Trojan War.



 



Edgar
Rice Burroughs

(1875-1950):  American author known for
his Tarzan series.



 



Alexandrine:  A line of verse containing 12 syllables.



 



 I. A. Richards (1893-1979): A
contemporary of Lewis who wrote literary criticism and co-authored The Meaning of Meaning (1923) which
dealt with the contextual theory of language. 
Lewis would not have been in agreement with Richards; nevertheless,
Lewis recognized Richards as "a critic whose works are almost the necessary
starting-point for all future literary theory" (Selected Literary Essays, p. 278n). 
Richards believed that the arts should replace religion and belief in
the modern world.



 



Eumenides:  Part 3 of Aeschylus' tragedy, The Oresteia.  A euphemistic term for the Greek Furies,
spirits who tormented the guilty.



 



François
Rabelais

(1783-1553):  French Renaissance writer,
priest and scholar.



 



Fabliaux (pl):  A genre for French literature consisting of a
brief, raunchy, comic tale in verse. 
Chaucer reworked some into the Canterbury Tales.



 



"The
Rape of the Lock
":  A mock-epic
satirical poem by Alexander Pope.



 



Kickshaw:  A fancy food or trinket.



 



"smiles
from reason flow
":  From Milton's Paradise Lost, Book IX, Line 239.



 



 



Chapter 3



 



9.  How did Lewis use illustrations as a
child?  What is the purpose of toys or
ikons?



 



 



 



10.  What constitutes real appreciation of art
according to Lewis?



 



 



 



11.  Describe a time when a work of art did
something to you.



 



 



 



 



Notes



 



The
Monarch of the Glen
:  An oil painting by Sir Edwin Landseer
commissioned for Westminster Palace.  
Depicting a stag against a Scottish landscape, it became popular
especially for use in advertising.  The
Hartford Financial Services Group, for instance, uses it as a logo.



 



The
Old Shepherd's Chief Mourner

Another work by Landseer, this time of a bereft dog resting his head on
his master's coffin.



 



Bubbles:  A painting by Sir John Everett Mills of a
small boy blowing bubbles that was used in advertising Pears soap.



 



Trompe-l'oeil:  An art technique using perspective to create
an illusion.  For example, a wall mural
may feature a door or hallway to give the impression of a larger space.



 



Tintoretto
(1518-1594):  Italian Renaissance painter
whose work The Three Graces features
nude women.



 



Botticelli
(1445-1510):  Italian Renaissance painter
whose work Mars and Venus depicts the
Roman gods reclining in a grove attended by satyrs.



 



Cimabue
(1240-1302):  Florentine painter whose work
Crucifixion departed from the flat
Byzantine style of art and moved toward naturalism.



 



Ernst
Ludwig Kirchner

(1880-1938):  German expressionist
painter.  The Nazis considered his work
degenerate.  He committed suicide in
1938.



 



Hoarding:  billboard



 



Zum
Eckel find' ich immer nur mich

Probably a line from Wagner's opera Die
Walk?re
and translates roughly, "I find forever only myself, ad
nauseam." 



 



Berceuse:  A musical composition in 6/8 time intended
for a lullaby.



 



Impi:  Zulu for an armed regiment.  The Zulu are an ethnic group living in South
Africa whose language is known for its clicking sound.



 



Précis:  A summary or abstract.



 



Lacrimose (or
lachrymose):  Tearful, mournful, given to
weeping.



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 



 





An Experiment in Criticism



By C. S. Lewis



 



 



 



Chapter 1



 



1.  List the four contrasts C. S. Lewis makes
between "the majority" (the many) and "the literary" (the few). 



 



 



 



2.  What are some titles you have re-read?



 



 



 



3.  How do you feel when deprived of the
opportunity to read?



 



 



 



4.  When have you fed on a great picture - or a
good book, film, or musical composition - for years?



 



 



 



 



Chapter 2



 



5.  Lewis describes several more types of
readers.  Select one and discuss what
keeps this type from being literary in C. S. Lewis's sense of the word.  Have you, or someone you know, fallen into
one of these categories?



 



 



6.  Lewis talks about the danger of making
literature a school subject.  Do you
agree/disagree?



 



 



 



7.  What constitutes a true reader?



 



 



 



8.  What problem does Lewis find with the term
"serious reader"?  What does he propose
instead?



 



 



 



 



Notes



 



Cognoscenti:  Well-informed people with a specialized
knowledge; connoisseurs.



 



Gigadibs:  Refers to a shallow journalist in Robert
Browning's poem "Bishop Blougram's Apology" (1855).  In 1013 lines of blank verse, the Bishop
defends his faith against charges leveled by the skeptical journalist named
Gigadibs.



 



Dryasdust:  A boring speaker.  Refers to Jonas Dryasdust, an imaginary
literary authority Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) utilized to provide background
information in his novels.



 



Andromaque: A tragedy by
French playwright Jean Racine (1639-1699) set during the aftermath of the
Trojan War.



 



Edgar
Rice Burroughs

(1875-1950):  American author known for
his Tarzan series.



 



Alexandrine:  A line of verse containing 12 syllables.



 



 I. A. Richards (1893-1979): A
contemporary of Lewis who wrote literary criticism and co-authored The Meaning of Meaning (1923) which
dealt with the contextual theory of language. 
Lewis would not have been in agreement with Richards; nevertheless,
Lewis recognized Richards as "a critic whose works are almost the necessary
starting-point for all future literary theory" (Selected Literary Essays, p. 278n). 
Richards believed that the arts should replace religion and belief in
the modern world.



 



Eumenides:  Part 3 of Aeschylus' tragedy, The Oresteia.  A euphemistic term for the Greek Furies,
spirits who tormented the guilty.



 



François
Rabelais

(1783-1553):  French Renaissance writer,
priest and scholar.



 



Fabliaux (pl):  A genre for French literature consisting of a
brief, raunchy, comic tale in verse. 
Chaucer reworked some into the Canterbury Tales.



 



"The
Rape of the Lock
":  A mock-epic
satirical poem by Alexander Pope.



 



Kickshaw:  A fancy food or trinket.



 



"smiles
from reason flow
":  From Milton's Paradise Lost, Book IX, Line 239.



 



 



Chapter 3



 



9.  How did Lewis use illustrations as a
child?  What is the purpose of toys or
ikons?



 



 



 



10.  What constitutes real appreciation of art
according to Lewis?



 



 



 



11.  Describe a time when a work of art did
something to you.



 



 



 



 



Notes



 



The
Monarch of the Glen
:  An oil painting by Sir Edwin Landseer
commissioned for Westminster Palace.  
Depicting a stag against a Scottish landscape, it became popular
especially for use in advertising.  The
Hartford Financial Services Group, for instance, uses it as a logo.



 



The
Old Shepherd's Chief Mourner

Another work by Landseer, this time of a bereft dog resting his head on
his master's coffin.



 



Bubbles:  A painting by Sir John Everett Mills of a
small boy blowing bubbles that was used in advertising Pears soap.



 



Trompe-l'oeil:  An art technique using perspective to create
an illusion.  For example, a wall mural
may feature a door or hallway to give the impression of a larger space.



 



Tintoretto
(1518-1594):  Italian Renaissance painter
whose work The Three Graces features
nude women.



 



Botticelli
(1445-1510):  Italian Renaissance painter
whose work Mars and Venus depicts the
Roman gods reclining in a grove attended by satyrs.



 



Cimabue
(1240-1302):  Florentine painter whose work
Crucifixion departed from the flat
Byzantine style of art and moved toward naturalism.



 



Ernst
Ludwig Kirchner

(1880-1938):  German expressionist
painter.  The Nazis considered his work
degenerate.  He committed suicide in
1938.



 



Hoarding:  billboard



 



Zum
Eckel find' ich immer nur mich

Probably a line from Wagner's opera Die
Walk?re
and translates roughly, "I find forever only myself, ad
nauseam." 



 



Berceuse:  A musical composition in 6/8 time intended
for a lullaby.



 



Impi:  Zulu for an armed regiment.  The Zulu are an ethnic group living in South
Africa whose language is known for its clicking sound.



 



Précis:  A summary or abstract.



 



Lacrimose (or
lachrymose):  Tearful, mournful, given to
weeping.